Thursday, August 6, 2015

Tutorial & Review: DIY Latex Skin Barrier from Sally Beauty

If you're into nail art, I'm guessing that you've probably heard of latex skin barriers. And if you have heard of latex skin barriers, then you know that they're pretty expensive (anywhere from $10 - $25). Well if you've always wanted to try a latex skin barrier but you don't know if it's for you, I've got an alternative that may interest you, and it's just $1.99 at Sally Beauty.

For those who don't know what a latex skin barrier is, it's simple. Think of latex in liquid form, that you can brush onto the skin around your nail to protect your skin from nail polish. You can then stamp, sponge, or paint your nail as messily as you'd like and. once you're done, you simply peel off the latex and your skin is polish-free. No mess!


So now that you know what a latex skin barrier is, here's my tutorial and review...



Proclaim Super Bond Professional Formula Hair Glue - Dark
(retail: $1.99 at Sally Beauty, 0.75 oz.)

A while back, reader @swatchitupanotch on Instagram kindly let me know that this wig glue was on sale for $0.99 at Sally (sorry, that sale is over now but the full retail price is just $1.99) and she also told me about how this could be used like a latex skin barrier. That instantly grabbed my attention, because you know I'm all about trying low-cost DIY alternatives for things. So I picked up a bottle about a month ago, and when I posted a pic on my Instagram, Sally Beauty actually reposted my photo (thanks, Sally!) and they mentioned that this is actually one of THEIR favorite tricks


Made in USA

IMPORTANT: Before I get into my tutorial/review, let me say that, as with anything I share with you here on the blog, I am in no way responsible for any issues you may have with this product. If you are allergic to latex and your fingers fall off after you use this, not my fault! I'm simply sharing MY experience with you, and it's entirely up to you if you'd like to try this yourself. Keep in mind that this glue is designed for wigs, so it's skin-safe to that extent. But you should never, no matter what you've heard, use this glue for eyelashes or get it anywhere near your eyes (there's a warning about that right on the bottle). I personally am fine with using this on my fingers, especially since you're removing it almost immediately after it dries. But please, do your research and abide by your own comfort levels.

TUTORIAL:


Now you can apply this directly from the bottle, but please be aware that the opening is pretty big, which means you're not going to have a lot of control with application. I know a lot of people like to pour the entire bottle into a clean, empty nail polish bottle and apply it with a nail polish brush (like you would apply nail polish), which I think is great. But in my case, I didn't have an empty polish bottle lying around, so I simply dipped a toothpick into the bottle and applied it that way. It was actually quite easy once I got the hang of it, since the latex is thin and easy to "smear" on to the skin. The key is that you have work quickly, because this product dries in just a second or two.

NOTE: My nails aren't dirty in these photos (ew!)--that's blue polish residue from my first botched attempt at photographing this product for you. You could not see the blue nail polish against the black latex, so I removed it and tried again with peach polish. 


If you get this on your nail when you're applying it, just wait for it to dry (literally, a second or two) and you can push it back, no problem.



The latex removes extremely easily--no tugging required. In fact, it's kind of fun to remove it, especially if you're a "peeler." (Which I am. Big time.)


Keep in mind that I really exaaggerated my polish application in these photos, just to show you how messy you CAN be, and still have this work for you. Also, notice that since I was so messy, a lot of polish pooled up near my cuticle and alongside my nail bed. That might be an issue for you if you're using this product for just regular nail-painting, so I think this product is best for nail stamping, nail sponging, fan-brush manicures and the like. Basically any type of messy nail art that doesn't tend to leave pools of polish on the sides of your nail. Because unless you get that latex right up next to your nail, the polish will seep through and you'll still have some clean-up to do after you remove the latex.

After removal, wash your hands with soap & water to remove residue

If you do a lot of nail art and you're tired of applying tape around your nails or using acetone to clean up your manicures, then I think this might be a nice, low-cost way to see if latex skin barriers are for you. Until I try the real thing, I'll be reaching for this when I'm doing any type of messy nail art, and I think I might clean out an old polish bottle so that I can transfer the latex into that (I'm thinking a nail striper polish would be awesome due to the extra-thin brush) for easy brush-on application. But for now, the toothpick method is working fine for me as described above, and really the only thing I'm not exactly jazzed about is the scent. This stuff smells a bit funky (sort of like hair dye), but it's not super strong like hair dye. Put it this way: I can smell it during application, but I don't have to open a window or turn on a fan. And once the latex dries, the smell is pretty much gone.

You can purchase this product both in-store and online at Sally Beauty for $1.99 per bottle.

If you'd like more info and/or application tips, check out the comments on my post on Instagram HERE. So many of you generously shared tips on that post (thank you!) and I found them all extremely helpful!

Do you own any latex skin barriers? If so, have you tried this Sally Beauty DIY version? How do you think this compares to the real thing? I'd love to hear from you. 

And thanks again, @swatchitupanotch, for the awesome tip about this product!

The products featured in this post were purchased with personal funds. For more information, click here.
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46 comments

  1. Oh, wow, G, thank you SO MUCH. I can dive back into water-marbling! Michelle at All Lacquered Up mentioned using latex body paint, but that's still pricier than I like, so this is like a dream come true for my wallet. :-D

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    1. So glad I could help! I'd love to know what you think after you give this a try. Please keep me posted? :)

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  2. Wow, I did not expect it to be black? Thanks for sharing!!!

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    1. Lol, yeah it's for dark hair. :)

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    2. Yes, whoops, I saw that after I posted of course!

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  3. Wow, this review is just what I needed! No kidding. I have been on the hunt for a few weeks now for a latex barrier. Apparently OPI has one, but I can't find it in any store in my area. This is going to be great. And the funny thing is, I was going to stop by Sally tomorrow to see if they had the Fall China Glazes yet. THANKS, G!

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    1. Omg that is crazy!!! We're definitely on the same wavelength right now! :)

      I'd love to know how this works for you after you try it, Carol!

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  4. Thanx for the tip! This can be purchased at any beauty supply store btw even if t's a different brand. They all are usually black and serve the same purpose so I'm sure the ingredients are all the same.

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  5. I am an artist, and I've used a masking product by Liquitex, its Liquid mask....basically the same stuff. It peels off canvas, paper, etc. Easily found in art supplies at craft stores. I never had a reaction while working with it for art, and had it on my fingers while working. You might try that product as well if you can't find this stuff

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    1. Interesting!! Thanks so much for the alternative! Also, I'd love to see your work. :)

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    2. I don't think Liquitex is making that anymore, and the only other art masking fluid I've been able to find is ridiculously expensive.

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  6. I use this product for eyelash glue! Works amazing!!

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    1. As I mentioned in my post, this product is NOT safe for the eye area (see warning label on the bottle). I world highly recommend you not use this as lash glue.

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  7. This is something I will be definitely buying the next time I go to Sally's.

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    1. I'd love to know what you think when you try it, Erica! :)

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  8. Darn I wish that I hadn't jumped the gun and bought the big tub of body latex on Amazon. Oh well I decanted and will last forever! I'm sure at some point I will buy this on sale just for show! Sh!ts and giggles!

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    1. Lol!! Well at least you're set for a looooong time! ;)

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    2. Yep this stuff is the bomb and will last forever, I've had mine for months and haven't made a dent in the jar!

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  9. Haha, loving that little disclaimer in there ;-) My fingers don't fall off from using latex for as far as know, this sounds kind of neat, I might give it a try!

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  10. Would this be good for water marbling too?

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    1. Absolutely! I should have mentioned that in my post. This is one of the preferred types of products for water marbling! :)

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    2. Heck yes! Its the only way to go about it IMO!

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  11. When I saw it was for wigs, I had this moment of confusion, but reading on ... it actually looks like it'd work pretty well. It should be less drying, too. Sometimes using acetone to clean up can leave my cuticles desperate for moisture.
    If it was painted on the nail precisely it looks like it could possibly be used for a negative space manicure or something. For $2 it'd be fun to experiment with!

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    1. Ooooh, I haven't done any research about using this for negative space manis (for shame, since you know those are my fave!) but now I must try! Thanks for the awesome idea! :)

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    2. That is a great idea! I need to try it too

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    3. It is great for negative space😊

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  12. Wow... this looks so cool.. I am unfortunately allergic to latex :( if there are any non latex alternatives out there. I would love to hear about them

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    1. Jenn- Ellagee Polish makes both a latex and a non latex version for those with allergies. She also makes gorgeous polish!

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    2. Meg- Thank you!!! I will definitely go and try that :)

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    3. Hmmm rubber cement glue maybe?

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  13. I do the same thing with liquid latex body paint I got from Amazon in a huge tub, I apply via the empty np bottle technique and it comes in tons of fun colors if you choose. I have turqoise right now. Smells a bit chemically but goes away very similar to this from the sounds/looks of it :) works great for me and like you said, way more economical!

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  14. I was just at Sally Beauty and it is on sale for .99 and they had a bigger bottle w/ 4oz in it for $2.99. I just got the bigger one.

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    1. Omg no way! Aaaah, thank you!!! So glad to hear the sale is back!!! :)

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  15. I have a couple of other ones- I will stamp soon and try the three and compare. Thanks for the review! This blog is my daily favorite go to. <3

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  16. For the latex allergic I was thinking a peel off facial mask? Or any skin mask that dries as a barrier.

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  17. This can be done with school glue (like Elmer's) as well! Just paint the liquid around your finger like you would this or latex, and then peel off once you're done. Probably even safer to use, especially since it has to be kid safe.

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    1. Yeah, tried it and doesn't have enough 'stick' for my cuticle area but this trick works great as a peel off base coat. Most of them are just Elmers glue ingredients anyway, with fancy names and higher prices. :)

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  18. I almost always have little bits left behind with this but till I suck it up and buy something like Bliss Kiss Simply Peel this will do. It works pretty well overall though, especially for the price! I use it when doing sponge gradients and it saves me sooooo much clean up.

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  19. Fantastic and über detailed review as usual! As for that ingredient list though...never heard of "dimeNthecone." Wondering if the letter n was a typo...

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